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Innovations for the season DOWNLOAD PDF


The Fall/Winter edition of Amazon India Fashion Week 2016, held from 16 to 20 March 2016 in New Delhi, had amazing fabric innovations. The developments were ideal for the season, says MEHER CASTELINO

As the year wears on, designers need to cater to a rather cool autumn and cold winter climate. Indian designers showcasing at the Fall/Winter edition of Amazon India Fashion Week 2016 offered buyers season-specific products, including experiments with textiles.

Akaaro by Gaurav Jai Gupta is known for innovative textiles. This time too, its hallmark was a mix of different weaves and textures. Gupta showed a collection of handwoven, reversible fabrics called Mumuksha, inspired by the travel and art of American photographer Trey Ratcliff. There were fine blends of merino wool, monofilament silks, cotton, zari and Akaaro’s very popular stainless steel woven fabrics. The collection was a line of separates with some sarees. Suiting fabric was used with engineered techniques for oversized coats and jumpsuits with merino wool blouses, draped sarees in cotton and zari and wool waistcoats.

Rina Dhaka’s collection revolved around wool knits for dresses and blouses. Lurex went into black and white tribal sheath dresses, and black and gold bagru butis showed up on skirts. You could not miss the long, black and white knitted dress with traditional gold buti. A hint of sheer sprinkled with applique flowers was on yokes of long sleeved dresses frilled at the hemline and sleeves. Zari autumn leaves on satin capes brought in glitter. Glamour was epitomised by embroidered sheaths.

Pallavi Mohan’s Not So Serious label balanced fashion and functionality. Pallavi paired woollen tweed with soft velvet, silk, organza and satin. To laser cut leather in interwoven stripes, Pallavi added velvet, organza and satin. The palette was winter hues of wine, amber and teal. The silhouettes? Voluminous. Long, sleeveless coats worn over trousers and midi skirts with high slits paired with culottes. Embroidered bomber jackets with oversized lapels turned heads.

The Mashru collection from Virtues, Ahmedabad, was named after the craft from Patan in Gujarat. The shiny surface was woven in a combination of silk warps and cotton wefts. The collection had autumnal detailing. Layering was visible in printed maxis topped with tunics and long, embroidered coats. Rich odhnas were part of the long skirtblouse combination. Multi-coloured printed maxis were worn with embroidered, floor-length covers.


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