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New age khadi DOWNLOAD PDF


Khadi is the only Indian feelgood fabric as it gives employment to thousands as well as boosts the economy and sustains indigenous artisans. Supporting khadi is one way of encouraging the talented artisan to live in his ancestral village rather than give up in despair and flock to an urban slum for an alternative employment. But khadi is far from fading away, thanks to the fillip given to the fabric by the Prime Minister himself. Meher Castelino writes on the state of khadi affairs and how some designers are moulding it anew.

The story of khadi in contemporary India is a story of India’s resurgence as a nation, a vital part of our national revival. What began with Mahatma Gandhi got a recent fillip when Prime Minister Narendra Modi gave the fabric a fresh push up the fashion ladder by wearing the fabric even during his visits abroad.

Khadi is handmade, handspun, handwoven – a natural fabric which is eco-friendly, breathes well and can be cool for summer and warm for winter. Blended with natural fibres, it has a whole new texture in fall and feel. A couple of washes removes the starch and makes it light and airy. Smaller runs in khadi with mixed materials in different permutations and combinations is a dream come true for designers like Krishna Mehta. For designers like Payal Khandwala, it’s the romance of something handwoven untouched by machines and factories along with the fabric’s inherent imperfections that make it unique and unmatched.

However, the golden girl of Indian fabric comes with a few minuses. Comparatively high-maintenance, the natural dyes require a cold water wash and cannot withstand harsh detergents, machine washes and harsh ironing. Sometimes, clients cannot fathom why there are gaps in the thread. What they need to comprehend is that is actually the beauty of khadi. Designers like Anita Dongre want fine, soft fabrics for womenswear but khadi is often only available in coarser, heavier weights. Khadi, if promoted by the rich and famous, would have a great future but since it lacks the finesse of wool or silk it’s a drawback.

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