Fashion Talk
Dolly J

Dolly J

Designer
Label – Dolly J

Product ranges are going to get more expansive

Dolly J’s eponymous occasionwear label is marked by meticulous craftsmanship on modern Indian silhouettes. The label’s ethereal eveningwear pieces beautifully juxtapose traditional hand-embroideries such as lucknowi chikankari and zariwork against delicate fabrics. In an interview with Shilpi Panjabi, the designer talks about Indian bridalwear.

Fibre2Fashion: How has the market for designer clothes evolved in the last decade?

Dolly J:

Over the last decade, with the popularity of social media, global fashion has become increasingly accessible. This has allowed for tastes to be developed by international trends, and the market has followed a similar trajectory.

Fibre2Fashion: How has been the demand for weddingwear post COVID-19?

Dolly J:

Since weddings are often a grand affair in India, and people wish to celebrate with extravagance, many couples chose to postpone their wedding during the pandemic. So, post COVID-19, the demand for weddingwear skyrocketed as weddings were happening in full swing after almost two years.

Fibre2Fashion: Have style preferences and need for extravagance changed due to more intimate weddings during COVID-19?

Dolly J:

During the pandemic, since weddings often shifted towards smaller guest lists and some were even conducted online, the trend shifted from extravagance to brides giving more importance to their own personal tastes and preferences. We found that in the simplicity of smaller weddings, personal style became more important than ever before.

Fibre2Fashion: What is the average time taken to make a bridal lehenga at your studio?

Dolly J:

Bridal lehengas involve intricate work with many artisans working on them. In our studio the average bridal lehenga takes between four and eight weeks.

Fibre2Fashion: Which are your major markets in India and abroad?

Dolly J:

The entire northern India belt has been a major market, and Hyderabad in the south. Outside the country, NRIs tend to purchase a lot of Indian couture, particularly in the UK and all over the US.

Fibre2Fashion: What are the preferences in terms of fabric, colour, look and fit for Indian and NRI brides?

Dolly J:

Every bride comes from a different school of thought, and so it’s difficult to pin down a particular trend; some are extremely traditional in their look, while some are more experimental. With NRI brides, however, we have noticed that they tend to prefer traditional looks for their big day.

Fibre2Fashion: What are the major trends in bridalwear for autumn/winter this year?

Dolly J:

Recently, it seems that blouses have given away to corsets for trendier looks, and trails are getting bigger with dramatic flairs.

Fibre2Fashion: What is the sales ratio of online versus in-store when it comes to bridalwear or weddingwear?

Dolly J:

Even though brides will often shop online for other functions, they almost always prefer shopping in store even now for the big day. Since couture is so personalised, it is difficult for the look to come across clearly when you shop online. When a bride sees herself in her dream outfit, she can be far more certain about the choice she’s making.

Fibre2Fashion: Do you plan to open new stores or expand your product offerings? Please share a few details.

Dolly J:

Many things are in the pipeline right now, and product ranges are going to get more expansive. Let’s see how it goes!

Fibre2Fashion: What are you planning for your next collection? What kind of fabrics, colours, embroidery, trims and patterns can be expected?

Dolly J:

The next collection is inspired by the idea of change. You can expect dramatic cascades, gold silhouettes and fluidity of concept and colour.

Published on: 18/07/2022
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