Fashion Talk
Aneeth Arora

Aneeth Arora

Fashion Designer
Péro

It's our duty to make Indian textiles viable globally

The Woolmark Company has partnered with handmade fashion label Péro and Kullu-based wool weavers' cooperative Bhuttico to create a unique #FarmToFashion collection.  Designer Aneeth Arora talks  about the inspiration behind the collection and the collaboration with The Woolmark Company.

Fibre2Fashion : Tell us about your autumn/winter collection in collaboration with Bhuttico and Woolmark.

Aneeth Arora:

Péro fall-winter 2019 is an attempt to narrate the journey of merino wool from Australia to the handlooms of Himachal Pradesh, on to the runway narrowing down the gaps between places and people, nature and crafts. This season Péro looks back to look forward, with archival textiles from Himachal Pradesh, inspiring new colours, patterns and drapes.

We have been working with merino wool for 10 years now, but after showcasing our work at the International Woolmark Prize competition twice, we realise that if The Woolmark Company recognises the fact that we have been using merino it will be good for us, and that is what happened this time.

The Woolmark Company approached us to collaborate with them and Kullu-based wool weavers' co-operative Bhuttico for Lakme Fashion Week Summer/Resort 2019. This season was an opportunity for us to be recognised by a brand like The Woolmark Company where now we feel they have also understood that we are one of the very few Indian brands who have been using merino for a very long time. We have been working with Kullu weavers for close to a decade.  This time, we worked with Bhuttico and realised that their strength is weaving traditional textiles from Kullu and we could use their skills and revive traditional textiles like 'pattu', which we had not done so far with our Kullu weavers.  

Fibre2Fashion : What was the inspiration for the collection? What were the main influences in terms of design, look and feel, and mood of the collection?

Aneeth Arora:

The geometric pattern that is seen on the 'pattus' were incorporated in the clothing in the form of engineered textiles, which we made keeping the placement of motifs in mind and how they will show on the garment. The fact that we weaved these Kullu borders was very exciting because we believe in a lot of details. We also use a lot of trims in our clothes and so we develop these tapes in our colours of choice and we use them as trims and ties in our collection.

Fibre2Fashion : What techniques have you used for the collection? How much time did the weaving of fabrics take?

Aneeth Arora:

The fabrics were meticulously woven by the weavers using the extra weft technique where each thread is inlayed with hand to create patterns while weaving the fabric on the loom-a technique as intricate as hand embroidery. Using the same technique, we also designed tapes and borders locally known as kushi, traditionally woven on a special miniature loom. These tapes have been incorporated in this season's clothing, as ties and trims in coordinated tones for a fuss-free approach. Apart from experimenting with traditional weaves, natural textiles are created with speckled effects and soft twists using combinations of varied thicknesses of merino yarn within one weave. We also have handwoven and engineered jacquard houndstooth patterns running alongside our dynamic display of stripes and checks.

Fibre2Fashion : How many styles does the collection have? How have you used merino wool in the collection?

Aneeth Arora:

We have a lot of chunky oversize jackets because we have experimented with very light and very heavy wool. The collection has overalls, dresses, a huge variety of tops and bottoms, jackets and dungarees. We have pretty much covered everything from flowy dresses to very structured jackets within the collection.

Fibre2Fashion : Who is the target buyer for Péro?

Aneeth Arora:

With unparalleled passion for wool and imperfect textures, this womenswear story seamlessly blends the adventurous spirit of The Distinguished Women's delicate grunge look with classic style and tradition, creating a new contemporary dress code yet keeping a sense of history intact. It is all about having to make that leap from being prim and proper to breaking free into a new you. So, every woman who identifies with this aesthetic is our target. This collection crosses the geographic boundaries and given the versatility of merino wool, can be worn by any woman, anywhere in the world.

Fibre2Fashion : How well recognised are Indian weaving techniques globally?

Aneeth Arora:

As designers, it is our duty to make Indian textiles and weaving viable globally. If all the traditional crafts were viable on their own, they would have had an international market already. I feel design intervention is needed everywhere, because the best combination can be that of the craft and design. Now, more people are becoming sensitive towards Indian craftsmanship and textile. We have a long way to go as India has no dearth of traditional craftsmanship. It is a slow process, but we are educating people about these traditional crafts which aren't actually trending. (HO)

expert speak VIEW ALL

It was not very long ago that people who shopped online in India were considered 'ahead of time'....
Posted by
Arun Sirdeshmukh | Jan 21,2016
A few years later, the same process is now taking place in textile printing, and this has never...
Posted by
Gabi Seligsohn | Feb 04,2016
The focus in research and development (R&D) is now more and more set on new sustainable products...
Posted by
Fanny Vermandel | Jun 24,2016
Indians are too enamoured of Hollywood. We can’t help it. We have been conditioned this way. The...
Posted by
Anurag Batra | Sep 02,2015
Why do I ask if India can afford to miss the bus again? Because whether we like it or not, whether...
Posted by
Rahul Mehta | Aug 12,2017
It was in 1987 that Asif Merchant got into the business of wholesaling of footwear. He bought from...
Posted by
Asif Merchant | Sep 02,2015
Imagine a cricketer, once an exciting player but now aged 45, having put on oodles of weight, too...
Posted by
Rahul Mehta | Sep 11,2015
Luxury is a lifestyle, and fashion is just a minuscule part of it. Businesswise-the most visible or ...
Posted by
Abhay Gupta | Dec 23,2016
Effective quality management starts with a quality policy. Effectiveness is the extent to which...
Posted by
Pradip Mehta | Jan 23,2016
Is your business ready for Textiles 4.0? Before you can say, 'Yes', 'No', 'May be' or 'I don't...
Posted by
Aseem Prakash | Apr 25,2016